Go on an Eco-Expedition!

Welcome back from 2012, kiddies. We’ve been in hibernation mode, but we’re back in action now. We hope you got over what felt like a funky 2012, to welcome what is sure to be a better 2013. We can feel it. How do we know? Because we WANT it, guys. To that end, this just in…

Earthwatch volunteers use a dugout canoe to access parts of remote Kirindy Mitea National Park, on Madagascar. The volunteers are helping Dr. Luke Dollar (Pfeiffer University), a 2007 National Geographic Emerging Explorer, research the ecology of endangered carnivores on the island

Earthwatch volunteers use a dugout canoe to access parts of remote Kirindy Mitea National Park, on Madagascar. The volunteers are helping Dr. Luke Dollar (Pfeiffer University), a 2007 National Geographic Emerging Explorer, research the ecology of endangered carnivores on the island

Earthwatch Institute, the international environmental nonprofit and pioneer of “citizen science,” is launching six new expeditions in 2013. Whether you’d like to track chimps through the Ugandan forest (who wouldn’t?), climb aboard a boat to photograph dolphins of Costa Rica, or help unearth the ancient artifacts of Colorado’s earliest inhabitants, Earthwatch offers new ways to get involved in critical scientific research around the world. Earthwatch also offers hundreds of expeditions to about 60 research projects across nearly 40 countries. Since 1971, they’ve enabled people from all walks of life to join leading scientists in making a real contribution to the long-term research that is necessary for a healthy planet.

Earthwatch Expedition: Animals of Malawi in the Majete Wildlife Reserve

Animals of Malawi in the Majete Wildlife Reserve

Earthwatch inspires connections between people and the environment and provide a source of funding and people-power to those scientists carrying out crucial environmental research. For more than 40 years, they’ve pioneered the involvement of people from all walks of life in peer-reviewed scientific research worldwide, and inspired changes in mindset and organizational culture based on hands-on field research experiences.

Among the new expeditions is Animals of Malawi in the Majete Wildlife Reserve. On this 12 day experience, you’ll walk among elephant and eland – and perhaps even rhino or lion – in this spectacular ecosystem of savannah, woodland and rivers. You’ll track and count animals and assess predator-prey relationships to understand the effects of animal reintroduction and Reserve management.

Cynthia Evans, who joined Earthwatch expedition Trinidad’s Leatherback Sea Turtles in 2012 said, “This was one of the most rewarding experiences of my life. I cannot wait to get my passport renewed and start planning my next expedition!”

Hanging with the sea turtles in Trinidad (c) All rights reserved by ubcgrs

Hanging with the sea turtles in Trinidad (c) All rights reserved by ubcgrs

Tom Wyatt said of Canopies, Climate, and Critters of the Ecuadorian Rainforest, “Like all valuable experiences, the best are the unexpected and unpredictable, from stumbling across a brace of toucans, to playing multi-lingual football in the clouds.”

A full list of new projects include:

  • Animals of Malawi in the Majete Wildlife Reserve
  • Tracking Chimps Through the Trees of Uganda
  • Safeguarding Whales and Dolphins in Costa Rica
  •  Investigating Whales and Dolphins of the Norwegian Arctic
  • Uncovering the Mysteries of Colorado’s Ancient Basketmakers New
  • Wildlife of Australia’s Cloud Forest

http://www.earthwatch.org/requestguideform

Some teen teams are available in addition to the standard teams, but for those looking for something truly unique… this is your jam.

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